Tag: Morocco Tours

The Moroccan Music Scene, Your Morocco Tour Guide

On Marrakech’s Djemaa El Fna Square amongst the orange juice stalls and story tellers you will find stalls with CD’s testifying to the popularity and importance of Morocco’s contemporary music scene which began with the accession of King Mohammed VI in 1999 when greater liberalization of musical genre especially for young people who sought music which reflected their aspirations was gradually phased in and supported with musical festivals organized with royal support and sponsorship like the annual Mazawine Music Festival in Rabat, The Gnawa Festival in Essaouria and the World Sacred Music Festival in Fez. Moroccan TV and radio channels also play an important role with live performances. The Moroccan contemporary music scene and its festivals have successfully fused elements of its ancient Berber musical traditions with modern music such as Chaabi, Hiphop and Rai and Rap.

Morocco’s Rural Markets, Your Morocco Tour Guide

Even if your trip to Morocco is mainly centered around the major cities, it is worth getting out for a day into the countryside to see rural life. Although the majority of the Moroccan population now officially lives in urban areas, many retain an attachment to the land and their native town or village. It is worthwhile, therefore, seeing Moroccan life in a different context, as it is still lived by many people. Despite increasing urbanization, the agricultural sector in Morocco still employs around half of the workforce and there is nothing quite like the hub of activity on a Moroccan market day!

Morocco Books, Recommended Reading Before You Go

Travel Exploration Offers a Hand Curated and Select Picks of Morocco Books to read before you go. The Books to Read before you visit Morocco offer an insight into the country’s history, culture and traditions. Preparing an exciting Reading list of Morocco Books ranging from History to Fiction and Non Fiction as well as Design & Decor is part of the the holiday planning process. To better understand Morocco’s traditions carve out time to list to Moroccan Music and watch Moroccan Films. From Galvin Maxwell’s account of the rise and fall of the House of Glaoui to Tahir Shah’s story of moving his family to Casablanca and Paul Bowles, Spider’s House that weaves a web through the ancient medina of Fes Travel Exploration’s Reading List is a must for your Morocco adventure.

Moroccan Door Knockers,Treasures of the Medina,Your Morocco Tour Guide

In the ancient medinas of Morocco old Riad doors have become much sought after items by tourists and collectors along with new riad owners. Riad doors are in particular famous for their unique architectural design and colors in Marrakech,Fes and Essaouira. Other Moroccan cities in the North such as Asiliah and Chefchaouen also have medinas with charming door knockers that standout against their rich blue doors and city backdrop color. In Marrakech these doors they can be found in antique door specialists, craft shops and at the Bab el Khemis or Thursday market by the northern medina gate.

Imperial Meknes, What to See and Do, Your Morocco Tour Guide

Morocco ‘s 4th Imperial City of Meknes is often left off tourist itineraries. Meknes is a UNESCO World heritage site and has massive imposing ramparts, 25 kms long, built by Sultan Moulay Ismail, of the Alaouite dynasty, who ruled Morocco from 1672-1727. He chose Meknes as his capital because of the resistance and intrigue he encountered in Fes and Marrakech. He successfully defeated warring tribes and religious brotherhoods in the south uniting the country and repelling European invaders in the north, liberating Tangiers from British rule. The Sultan Moulay Ismaeil also withstood the Ottoman invaders who took Tunisia and Algeria.

Colorful Chefchaouen, Morocco’s Idyllic Escape, Your Morocco Tour Guide

Chefchaouen lies inland from Tangier and Tetouan. Chefchaouen is a unique Moroccan city known for its blue and white washed medina walls that surround it. Filled with old world charm, a walk through Chefchaouen’s blue alleys evokes being in a magical story book, similar to Aladdin and the magic lamp from One Thousand and One Nights. An early morning stroll through Chefchaouen’s winding streets is a great to discover this Riffian town famous for fresh goat cheese, local crafts and peaceful setting.

Summer in Morocco: Seaside Communities Things to do in Essaouira, Agadir and Oualidia

In Morocco in July and August when temperatures are on the high side, you can avoid the sweltering heat of the cities by heading to coastal resorts or the Atlas Mountain retreats where cooler breezes allow you to escape inland heat. Agadir’s long clean crescent beach on the Atlantic coast, offer opportunities for surfing, snorkeling, wind surfing and jet skiing. Most of the larger hotels and surf clubs on the beach rent out water sports equipment and surf boards and cool sea breezes keep the temperature down.

Oualidia the Well Kept Secret, Your Morocco Tour Guide

The lagoon and extensive beaches at Oualidia, lying between El Jadida and Safi, were a well kept secret and a favourite of Moroccans as a seaside venue and a place to unwind. Now it is finding increasing in popularity as a beautiful sheltered natural beach and fishing location where surfing and swimming in the lagoon are enjoyed by more tourists on a break from the busy streets of Casablanca and Marrakech.

Traveling with Children in Morocco, Your Morocco Tour Guide

Tourists who bring their families on vacation will find a special entry into Moroccan society. Moroccans love children and much of Moroccan society is focused on the family and their offspring. Children are warmly welcomed and treated with every consideration in Morocco. Teaching children a few words of Arabic before they come to Morocco can be very rewarding. Children are a tremendous icebreaker and waiters, maids and shopkeepers will be far more attentive when there are children around.

Taroudant, Mini-Marrakech & Walled Berber City, Your Morocco Tour Guide

If you want a relaxing stay in an authentic walled Berber town look no further than the medieval town of Taroudant. It lies beside the High Atlas mountains in the Sous Valley in the southern part of Morocco and it has retained its authentic Berber character and roots. Taroudant is well placed as a base for exploring the region to the east of Agadir and its beaches, it is on the road to Ouarzazate and the Sahara desert and adrive over the dramatic Tizi n’Test pass to Marrakech.